Third Sentence Thursday

Third Sentence Thursday is a meme hosted by me. To see the meme rules, the list of other blogs participating (or to join in the fun yourself), please go to the original post here. This weeks TST comes from Lucy by Jamaica Kincaid (read my review here).

“The yellow light from the sun came in through a window and fell on the pale-yellow linoleum tiles of the floor, and on the walls of the kitchen, which were painted yet another shade of yellow, and Mariah, with her pale yellow skin and yellow hair, stood still in this almost celestial light, and she looked blessed, no blemish or mark of any kind on her cheek or anywhere else, as if she has ever quarrelled with anyone over a man or over anything, would never have to quarrelled at all, had never done anything wrong and had never been to jail, had never had to leave anywhere for any reason other an a feeling that had come over her.” page 27

What an absolutely beautiful, atmospheric, lilting and highly imageric single sentence that is, huh? Just reading it evokes the sense of Lucy; almost like reading someone’s diary and considering their innermost thoughts and observations – glorious.

Third Sentence Thursday

Third Sentence Thursday is a meme hosted by me. To see the meme rules, the list of other blogs participating (or to join in the fun yourself), please go to the original post here. This weeks TST comes from The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of The Window And Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson.



“Elephants in general are not as logical in their thinking as are people.” page 86

 

 

What an Elephant has to do with a 100 year old man who climbed out of the window and disappeared is yours to find out – read the book and I promise you won’t be disappointed!

Third Sentence Thursday

Third Sentence Thursday is a meme hosted by me. To see the meme rules, the list of other blogs participating (or to join in the fun yourself), please go to the original post here. This weeks TST comes from Don’t You Want Me by India Knight (read my review here)



“I can’t very well spend my first morning at Happy Bunnies beating children up, but my goodness, I am sorely tempted.” page 27

This quote is a great example of the dry wit within Don’t You Want Me. India Knight astutely observes the inner monologue of a modern woman navigating herself through the PC world of “letting your children be, even if that means praising them for pooping on the floor”